Coronavirus (COVID-19) in Robeson County

Robeson County Resident Tests Positive for COVID-19. Second Positive Case for County.

 

A Robeson County resident that tested positive for COVID-19 is being monitored and is following isolation orders in this county. The private lab testing does not have to be confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and therefore this is considered a positive result. The patient remains at home. The patient is a resident of the county who was a close contact of the first case. The patient was tested at a local health clinic.

 

The Robeson County Health Department will work on identifying close contacts. CDC defines close contact as being within approximately 6 feet of a person for a prolonged period of time – 10 minutes or longer. Based on information provided by the individual, county health officials will assess risks of exposure, determine which if any additional measures are needed such as temperature and symptom checks, quarantine and/or testing.

 

Because COVID-19 is most commonly spread through respiratory drops. North Carolinians should take the same measures that health care providers recommend to prevent the spread of the flu and other viruses. These include washing your hands repetitively, avoiding touching your face, staying home if you are sick and covering coughs and sneezes with your elbow.

 

It is important to make sure the information you are getting about COVID-19 is coming directly from reliable sources like Robeson County Health Department, CDC and NCDHHS. Please visit the Robeson County Health Department and the Robeson County Government face book page/web site for links to CDC and NCDHHS. These sites are updated with the latest information.

 

Symptoms for COVID-19 are fever, cough and other lower respiratory illnesses (shortness of breath). Both of these cases reported that their taste and smell had diminished. If you have any questions please call the Health Department’s dedicated line at 671-3220 Monday through Friday 8:30 to 5:00 until further notice.

 

Recent guidelines change testing recommendations such that people with mild symptoms that are consistent with COVID-19 do not need testing, but rather they should stay home to recover. Coming out to be tested can expose a non-infected person or if the person is infected, it could expose other members of the community including those at high risk and health care workers.

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